Thermal Simulation of An Underfloor Heating System

Thermal Simulation of An Underfloor Heating System

Designing an underfloor heating system is not a matter of drawing lines on a paper; it also requires the use of engineering science. Over the years, a lot of people have adopted this system for their commercial buildings. Most who are favoring these heating systems are also, for the most part, the same ones who have embraced underfloor air distribution solutions. In the United Kingdom, for example, many buildings now have underfloor heating systems and underfloor ventilation systems. However, the actual performance of the heat emitter is often overlooked or unknown during the design stage of these systems. Underfloor heating systems were initially installed in newly developed properties within a 75mm thick sand and cement screed. Also, a 50mm thick anhydrite flowing screed was used in other scenarios. As the underfloor heating systems became popular, the market started to design new systems to be installed in new buildings as well as older ones. These new systems can be categorized as either suspended or floating floors, and there is an increased emphasis on low profile systems. However, underfloor heating systems come with their own challenges, and thermal simulation is required to solve these challenges. It also helps to reduce the costs which might be incurred uninstalling default systems. Thermal simulation of an underfloor heating system helps to: Locate thermal bridges, that is, at the windows, walls and heating pipes. Understand the dimension of heating systems in regard to their maximum power. Considerations for worst case scenarios like cold winter days are also made. Rate the underfloor heating system in regards to the achieved floor temperatures and human local comfort responsiveness....

The Structure and Performance of National Implementation Coordinating Units

Since April 1997, the General Secretariat of the Organisation of American States (GS/OAS) as the executing agency, and the World Bank as one of the Implementing Agencies of the Global Environmental Facility (GEF), in collaboration with the University of the West Indies, have been engaged in the implementation of a four year project entitled “Caribbean Planning for Adaptation to Climate Change” (“CPACC”). Funded by the GEF Trust Fund, the project seeks to support twelve CARICOM countries (“Participating Countries”) in preparing to cope with the adverse effects of global climate change particularly sea level rise, in coastal and marine areas. Working through a Regional Project Implementation Unit (“RPIU”) based in Barbados, as well as National Implementation Coordinating Units (“NICUS”) based in each participating country, the project utilises a combination of demonstration actions and regional training and technology transfers to achieve its objectives. Project activities are grouped within four regional and five pilot action components as follows: Regional Components (1) design and establishment of sea level/climate monitoring network; (2) establishment of databases and information systems; (3) inventory of coastal resources and use; and (4) formulation of a policy framework for integrated coastal and marine management. Pilot Components (5) coral reef monitoring for climate change; (6) coastal vulnerability and risk assessment; (7) economic valuation of coastal and marine resources; (8) formulation of economic/regulatory proposals; and (9) greenhouse gases inventory and vulnerability assessment of the agriculture and water sectors. Terms of Reference The Consultant was required to review and make recommendations on the functioning of NICUs with particular reference to their effectiveness in the following areas: • coordinating in-country activities; • preparing quarterly...